Category: Sustainability and Global Affairs

Faith + Food Coalition: Reflections for WHO Health Week – June 10th

The Faith + Food Coalition:
‘Faith and Food: Reflections for WHO Health Week’
Thursday, June 10th, 11 am ET
To contribute to the UN Food Systems Summit, the Faith + Food Coalition hosted five separate interfaith, multi-stakeholder dialogues corresponding to each of the five Action Tracks. The objective of the dialogues was to explore how faith communities – including Indigenous communities – can support the transformation of global food systems to being sustainable, accessible, equitable, and regenerative. This panel will reflect on the dialogues and offer insights into increased faith engagement leading up to the Food Systems Summit and beyond.
We need everyone engaged to find local and global food systems solutions for healthy people and a healthy planet. 🌍  Join us! www.faithandfood.earth

 

Andrew Schwartz has nearly a decade of experience working with community leaders and elected officials around the world to build movements, craft communications and affect change on climate and environmental issues. He is the Director of Sustainability and Global Affairs at the Center for Earth Ethics where he works to change both policies and culture to advance the sustained well-being of the people of the world. A graduate of the Union Theological Seminary, Andrew began his career as a youth representative to the United Nations Rio+20 Conference in Brazil in 2012. A native of Oregon, Andrew and his wife and daughter live in Portland.

 

Kelly Moltzen is a tireless advocate of making connections between food, faith, and social justice. In addition to being a co-convener of the Interfaith Public Health Network, Kelly is a program manager at the Institute for Family Health with the Bronx Health REACH initiative. She is a 2015 Re:Generate Fellow with the Food, Health and Ecological Well-Being Program of Wake Forest University School of Divinity, Professional Development Co-Chair with the Religion Member Interest Group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and a member of the Ecumenical/Interfaith Committee of the USA Secular Franciscan Order. She has an MPH from NYU, completed her dietetic internship with the James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and has a BS in Nutritional Sciences & Dietetics from the University of Delaware. Kelly was recognized as part of Hunter College’s NYC Food Policy Center 40 Under 40 Class of 2020. 

 

Dr. Marium Husain is an oncology hospitalist at the Ohio State University James Comprehensive Care Center. She graduated from The Ohio State University College of Medicine and completed a residency in Internal Medicine. She will be pursuing a fellowship in Hematology/Oncology. Marium has been working on community service projects in the Columbus area and abroad for the past 10 years. As a board member of the national non-profit, IMANA (Islamic Medical Association of North America), she has been working on public health education and creating domestic campaigns for food insecurity, reproductive health, mental health and climate change.

 

Joshua Basofin is a lawyer, conservationist, sustainability advisor, and climate change organizer. After a stint as a researcher and teaching assistant at the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies, Joshua worked as a sustainability advisor, first in Tel Aviv and then in New York with UK based nonprofit Forum for the Future. He now serves as the  Director of Climate Action for Parliament of the World’s Religions.

 

 

 

Bibi la Luz Gonzales is an international political economist merging food security. Climate, sustainability and human rights. She is the founder of Come Mejor Wa’ik//Eat Better Wa’ik. Bibi is a positive and enthusiastic multilingual Global Shaper, One Young World Ambassador, World Merit Guatemala Office Representative, and Merit360 SDG2 Executor.

 

 

 

Steve Chiu is Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation’s Representative at the United Nations. In alignment with Tzu Chi’s work in disaster relief, climate action, education for global citizenship, sustainable development and gender equality, Steve works to build relationships, share best practices and develop programs with other organizations to make tangible impacts on the ground, with the mission of alleviating the suffering of those in need. With over 19 years of experience in community based development and local interfaith partnership, Steve seeks to connect the importance of grassroots action to policies that are being developed on the international level.

 

Almamy Chouaibou Diagan

Co-Founder, Smart System Services + Rim Robotique designing technological solutions adapted to our cities to reduce the impact of man on the phenomenon of global warming. Co-Founder of the ‘’Union des Jeunes entrepreneurs Mauritanien’’ and member of the Network of young Mauritanian scientists.

 

 

 

Stineke Oenema is the Global Coordinator of the UN System Standing Committee on Nutrition (UNSN)

 

 

 

Dr. Maria P. Neira has been directing the Department of Environment, Climate Change and Health at the World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland since September 2005. Throughout her tenure and up until now she has led and advised on policy and management in key areas of environmental health.  Prior to that she served as Under-Secretary of Health and President of the Spanish Food Safety Agency. From 1993-1998 she was Coordinator of the Global Task Force on Cholera Control.

Dr Neira began her career as a medical coordinator working with refugees in El Salvador and Honduras for Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders). She then spent several years working in different African countries during armed conflicts. In early 2019, she was nominated among the top 100 policy influencers in health and climate change.  

 

Dr. Martin Frick is the Deputy of the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for the Food Systems Summit 2021. Previously, he served as the senior director of UN Climate Change where he oversaw the implementation of the Paris Climate Agreement and the secretariat’s climate action work.

The Faith + Food Coalition is convened by the Center for Earth Ethics in response to the call for contributions to the UN Food Systems Summit 2021.

Join us! www.faithandfood.earth

Faith + Food Dialogues Series Registration is Open!

Faith + Food Dialogues ~ May 6th – June 3rd

A series of independent dialogues hosted by the Faith and Food Coalition to contribute to the United Nations Food Systems Summit.

Food sits at the center of our lives. From a meal on the go to a holiday spent around the table with family and friends, food not only sustains us but helps define who we are. It informs aspects of our religious identities and marks how we choose to interact with the world.

Globally our relationship with food and the systems we utilize to produce it are having alarming effects on the earth and its people. Nearly 2 billion people are food insecure while billions more are ailing from diet related health issues. Human and planetary health are suffering as a result of how food is grown and what kinds of food are being encouraged.

This Fall, the Secretary-General of the United Nations will be convening a Food Systems Summit which will bring together farmers, politicians, business leaders, youth groups and other civil society members to examine how our global food systems can be reformed to equitably and sustainably feed the world.

To contribute, the Faith and Food Coalition is hosting five independent virtual dialogues to critically examine the role faith based organizations can bring to conversations about our food systems. These dialogues will take place as part of the broader Food Systems Summit Dialogues.

These dialogues are being organized by the following coalition of leading faith-based organizations: Bhumi Global, Interfaith Public Health Network, Islamic Medical Association of North America (IMANA), Parliament of the World’s Religions, the Tzu Chi Foundation, World Evangelical Alliance, and the Center for Earth Ethics.

 

 

Check out our livestream preview from March 26th –

Join CEE Executive Director Karenna Gore, Sustainability and Global Affairs Program Director Andrew Schwartz, Original Caretakers Program Senior Fellow Mona Polacca and Director of Bhumi Global Gopal Patel on our YouTube Channel.

 

Join the Faith + Food Coalition Community! www.FaithandFood.Earth

Seven Weeks for Water 2021, Holy Week: “Healing the water heals the wounds of the earth and its people”

Text: Isaiah 42:1-9

Refection:

There’s a town in the Central Valley of California named Allensworth. It’s a few hours from most anywhere and is easily missed in the web of state highways and wandering local roads that are bent this way and that by plots of almond groves.

The land is hard. Harder than it should be. Harder than it’s ever been. Decades of water-intensive farming by hedge fund managers and farmers who don’t have the moral imagination to look past tomorrow’s dollar have drained the land. So has climate change.  When Col. Allensworth founded the town in 1908 as a place for Black Americans looking for a chance to be free and live well, it was on the banks of Lake Tulare. The black farmers are echoes in history now because of racist policies that drove them off the land. Lake Tulare, once the largest lake west of the Rockies, is barely a shadow of itself. The waters that used to reliably come down from the distant Sierras in the spring melt have slackened and the seasonal rains are barely a spit.

Unsustainable farming and climate change have caused the water tables to drop in the Central Valley which has caused the arsenic concentration in the soil to rise. Arsenic is a naturally occurring element, traces of which have little effect on our health. However, the levels in the soil in Allensworth have reached the point of poison which not only makes the water undrinkable but unsafe for cooking or bathing.  In this pathetic water situation, the poor community residents must buy water for all needs. Most of the residents of Allensworth are Brown and Black. Most all of them are poor. That’s not an accident, of course. It never is. When land and the fruit it produces become commodities, the people who work it do too.

The last week of Lent is a paradox. It’s standing at the precipice knowing that death waits just a little bit further down the road. Even worse, knowing that the encounter with death is inevitable and irreversible, at least until it isn’t. 2020 was a year of death. The COVID-19 pandemic brought millions around the world to early deaths. But it also brought death to countless rituals and moments of community, and to dreams so hard-worked for that must be said goodbye to. It brought the death of reason for all too many, the death of security and even hope.

Hope is hard to find when death might be behind every breath, every hello, every I love you. But if Holy Week teaches us anything, it’s that death is not final. Death is the sister to dreams and dreams give birth to hope. We must not forget to dream. We must not forget that within God exist the seeds and waters of life that we cannot comprehend, and that the goodness will not be exhausted until justice is established in the Earth (Is. 42:4).

I’m reminded of the God who consistently makes a way out of no way. For whom death has no purchase. Who restores that which is broken and breathes life into a valley of bones? To me, it’s a mandate to dream of beauty. To dream of the act of creation and hope and healing and then to start working to make those dreams manifest.

In Allensworth, a collection of residents, scientists, environmentalists and people of goodwill have come together to heal. Amidst the rows of corporatized groves of almonds, this group is planting flowers and vegetables that heal and rehabilitate the land by drawing the arsenic into their roots and fibers. With each passing season of growth, harvest, decomposition, and growth again the soil becomes more healthy, more alive. As the soil is healed, the water heals too. Their effort is small but so is everything when it first begins. It will grow and, as it grows, the people and the land, and the water will find new life together.

Questions for discussion

  1. Baptism is used to symbolize rebirth and new beginnings. What would it mean for us to baptize the land and the waters that sustain us and the ecosystems we live in?
  2. Where do you see connections between pain in the natural world and pain in our society? How can healing one area help heal another?
  3. Climate change disproportionately impacts marginalized communities. Who in your community is the most at risk from pollution or toxic sites and why are they in more danger than others?

Actions

  1. Take time to learn about water usage in your area and how it affects the local ecosystem. Who is it managed by and how?
  2. What can you plant in your yard or church yard that can help rejuvenate the soil and bring health to the land?
  3. Learn who in your community or surrounding area is water insecure and dependent on bottled water for their daily needs. You can help them financially and by spreading awareness.
  4. Have your water and soil tested to learn what is in it.

Resources: 

  1. https://watersheddiscipleship.org
  2. https://centerforearthethics.org/resources-legacy/water-liturgies/
  3. https://blackchurchfoodsecurity.net
  4. http://interfaithfood.org/resources/congregational-toolkit/
  5. https://centerforearthethics.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/LOVE-THE-WATER-Steps-to-build-Community-and-Congregation-around-Water-2-1.pdf

* Andrew Schwartz lives in beautiful Portland, OR with his amazing wife and daughter. He’s the director of Sustainability and Global Affairs at the Center for Earth Ethics.

Watch: Faith + Food Coalition opens dialogues with livestream

The Center for Earth Ethics is so excited about the Faith + Food Coalition Dialogue Series – we hosted a livestream conversation Friday, March 26th!

Check out our conversation with CEE Executive Director Karenna Gore, Sustainability and Global Affairs Program Director Andrew Schwartz, Original Caretakers Program Senior Fellow Mona Polacca and Director of Bhumi Global Gopal Patel on why we are convening faith groups to talk about food systems and the contributions of indigenous wisdom to solving these complex challenges.

Bring a snack to eat! Make a cuppa.

Join the Faith + Food Coalition Community at faithandfood.earth!

A World Water Day Message from Mona Polacca

 

 

 

 

 

Taking time out today to acknowledge this divine creation. Water.

Where is your water?

What is happening to your water?

Who is making decisions about your water?

Where is the water that you come from?

What is your identity in relationship with your water?

 

The Center for Earth Ethics welcomes Mona Polacca as Senior Fellow, Original Caretakers Program. Mona is an elder of the Hopi, Tewa, and Havasupai lineages from the Blue-Green Waters of the Grand Canyon and the Colorado River.

Learn more…

The UN Secretary-General —  Remarks for the ONE PLANET SUMMIT 

THE UN SECRETARY-GENERAL 
 
REMARKS FOR THE ONE PLANET SUMMIT 
 
11 January 2021 
 
[All English version] 
 
Dear friends, 
 
2021 must be the year to reconcile humanity with nature. 
 
Until now, we have been destroying our planet.  
 
We have been abusing it as if we had a spare one.  
 
Our current resource use requires almost two planets but we only have one.   
 
If we compare Earth’s history to a calendar year, we have used one third of its natural resources in the last 0.2 seconds. 
 
We have been poisoning air, land and water – and filling oceans with plastics.  
 
Now, nature is striking back. 
 
Temperatures are reaching record highs. 
 
Biodiversity is collapsing. 
 
Deserts are spreading.  
 
Fires, floods and hurricanes are more frequent and extreme. 
 
And we are extremely fragile. 
 
Meanwhile, COVID-19 has taken more than 1.8 million lives and devastated economies. 
 
For the first time in this century, poverty is increasing.  
 
Inequalities are deepening. 
 
As we rebuild, we cannot revert to the old normal.  
 
Pandemic recovery is our chance to change course. 
 
With smart policies and the right investments, we can chart a path that brings health to all, revives economies and builds resilience and rescues biodiversity. 
 
Innovations in energy and transport can steer a sustainable recovery and an economic and social transformation.  
 
Nature-based solutions – such as Africa’s Great Green Wall – are especially promising. 
 
Preserving the world’s biodiversity also yields jobs: according to the World Economic Forum, emerging business opportunities across nature could create 191 million jobs by 2030. 
 
But the world has not met any of the global biodiversity targets set for 2020, and biodiversity is facing a financing gap of $711 billion per year until 2030.  
 
Sustainable financing is essential if we are to transition away from polluting sectors. 
 
Our meeting in Kunming, the COP in China, this year is a vital step in establishing a post-2020 global framework for biodiversity and stopping the extinction crisis. 
 
Dear friends, 
 
A new momentum is emerging. 
 
Many large emitters have committed to achieving zero net emissions by 2050. 
 
The main goal of the United Nations in 2021 is to build a truly global coalition for carbon neutrality. 
 
Every country, city and business must adopt an ambitious roadmap to achieve net zero emissions by 2050. 
 
The time has come to: 
 
Put a price on carbon. 
Stop building new coal plants. 
 
End fossil fuel subsidies. 
 
Shift the fiscal burden from taxpayers to polluters. 
 
Align public and private financial flows with the Paris Agreement commitments and the Sustainable Development Goals. 
 
And integrate the goal of carbon neutrality into all economic and fiscal decisions. 
 
We must also help the most vulnerable, who are already suffering from the effects of climate change. 
 
Today, adaptation efforts account for only 20 per cent of climate finance. 
 
Only 14 per cent of climate finance is dedicated to the least developed countries. 
 
This is far from enough, especially to protect small island States, which face an existential threat. 
 
Everyone must do much more. 
 
COP26 cannot be another missed opportunity. 
 
For three years, the One Planet Summit has been bringing together private, public and civil society actors around concrete initiatives at the country level. 
 
The High Ambition Coalition for Nature and People, which will be formally launched today, is a perfect example. 
 
Dear friends, 
 
We begin a new year under the sign of hope. 
 
Together, let us seize the opportunity to build a safer, fairer and more sustainable world. 
 
Thank you.  
 
 

Faith groups have a key role to play in reducing climate-linked violence

Originally published December 18th by Brian Lowe for Earthbeat: a project of National Catholic Reporter at NCR Online.

***

By now it’s well understood that climate change leads to rising seas and rising temperatures. It is also increasingly linked to rising conflicts.

In 2014, the Pentagon issued a major report that referred to climate change as both posing “immediate risks to U.S. national security” and being “a ‘threat multiplier’ because it has the potential to exacerbate many of the challenges we are dealing with today — from infectious disease to terrorism.”

Last year, Stanford University convened a group of top climate scientists, political scientists, economists and historians to examine the degree to which climate change has exacerbated conflicts in the past century. While it concluded that climate has had a limited effect on conflicts to date — less than factors like low socioeconomic development, weak governments and social inequalities — their study projected that warming of 2 degrees Celsius and beyond will substantially increase the risk of armed conflict.

“War is the negation of all rights and a dramatic assault on the environment,” Pope Francis tweeted on Nov. 6, the United Nations-designated International Day for Preventing the Exploitation of the Environment in War and Armed Conflict. He added that true integral human development must work to avoid all wars.

Tweet from Pope Francis, @Pontifex account, Nov. 20, 2020

Religious communities have a critical role to play in mitigating and resolving violent conflict stemming from rising global temperatures, says Karenna Gore, founder and director of the Center for Earth Ethics at Union Theological Seminary, in New York City.

In October, Gore received the 2020 Faith-in-Action Award from the International Center for Religion & Diplomacy (ICRD) for her work on how faith communities can both promote stewardship and preempt violent outbreaks.

EarthBeat recently spoke with Gore and James Patton, ICRD president and CEO, about the role of religion in mitigating and resolving violent conflicts fueled by climate change.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity. (The full interview is available in the video at the top of the page or by clicking here.)

EarthBeat: The U.S. Pentagon calls climate change a “threat multiplier.” What does that mean with regard to violent conflicts?

Patton: It’s not really just about sea level rise and different temperatures in different places in the world. If the sea does rise a meter, it will put a billion people on the move, and those people go to places that are already economically stressed. And oftentimes, that causes clashes [over resources] between groups of migrants and the host communities that they land in.

Then you add to that changes in rainfall patterns, seasonal glacial melt and how that affects fresh water availability, crop viability, high heat, increased winds, drier conditions contributing to wildfires. All of these things have an incredible impact on water and food availability, on livelihoods, on infrastructure. And that pushes people — usually people who are already economically disadvantaged — to struggle with one another over scarce resources.

When they do that, it very easily manifests in the kind of identity conflict that ICRD works on. People start to scapegoat one another around things like their tribes, their ethnicity, their faith. You see this oftentimes with migrant groups, particularly if they’re moving across borders from the global south to the north, or underdeveloped to more developed countries that have better resources. … The host communities then react to these immigrant groups negatively. And we’ve seen spikes in xenophobia across the world, particularly in the west and in Europe, that are all connected to some of these issues.

The fighting in Syria is a great example of the impact of drought. Rainfall patterns changed, food availability was impacted, and then people started to contest the leadership, and that was not accepted of course by [Syrian President] Bashar Al Assad. And it led to rebellion that led to incredible violence that has led to death and displacement throughout the region that has had significant ancillary effects and impacts, all grounded in what might be one of the most important climate-driven conflicts of recent times.

Read on…

Banks Gather for Finance in Common Summit on Sustainability Solutions – Will it Matter?

This week 450 public development banks (PDBs) are gathering at the Finance in Common Summit, a seminal moment in the world of banking. The banks in attendance represent nearly $2.5 trillion in annual investments ranging from local banks and projects to multilateral banks providing development assistance across the globe. The mandate is simple: reorient the financial world towards a sustainable path. 

It’s a heavy task to say the least. The era of capitalism and now neoliberal capitalism has made the unadulterated pursuit of profit sacrosanct and there are no better acolytes than those in the fossil fuel industries. Oil, gas, and coal have generated a degree of wealth and excess that has no corollary in history and has little chance of being matched in the future. It is made possible by once robust but now rapidly depleting gas and oil reserves, and a mechanistic and bureaucratic economy the facilitates its lopsidedness. The movers of loans and investments insist on control by a small number of experts who, in their diligence, require private control over the complexities of extraction, refinement, and shipment, but also the adjacent utilities such as water and electricity to insure that industry is done properly. These experts, of course, are not locals and the economic gravity sink they create pulls the cash ever Northward leaving small profits in the local orbit to be picked up by the same sort of sideways person that can be found everywhere who is willing to forgo national interests for their own. 

In 2016, the World Bank along with a number of other major multilateral development banks pledged to divest themselves from fossil fuel development projects to support the Paris Climate Goals. Despite their pledge, they have managed to provide some $10.5 billion in loans towards fossil fuel development while in that same time frame given relatively anemic funding for sustainable energy projects.

The World Bank and other PDBs have become so inured to the process that it has an inertia that is proving hard to derail. In the last two years the World Bank has surreptitiously bankrolled two coal mega projects one in Indonesia and the other in Guyana. Both are carbon bombs in their own right, the first in Indonesia which when fully operational will produce annual emissions equivalent to those of Spain and Thailand. The second supports Exxon’s endeavor to relieve Guyana of the nearly 13.6 billion barrels of oil and 32 trillion cubic feet of natural gas found off its coast. 

Enter the conversation that has started this week at the Finance in Common Summit. The question is not whether PDBs can agree to fund sustainable energy projects. Of course they can. There’s nothing more simple than giving $5 billion to Vestas instead of BP. No, the question is more existential. It’s asking whether or not this industry can willingly and fundamentally change the nature of its ultimate concern of profit no matter the costs. Can they move away from a development paradigm that is so streamlined and so disproportionately powerful and profitable for a system that is anything but? 

The problem with sustainability is that it is just that: it’s sustainable. Once the minerals are mined, the turbines up and the solar panels in place the profit margins become relatively slim as compared to fossil fuels. There is no shipping of product, no enormous subsidies from governments – estimates place them between $400 billion and $5 trillion – and no profits from service stations, downstream plants, and petrochemicals products. 

This is not to say there aren’t profits in sustainable energy. There are but a new generation of companies such as Tesla, Vestas, and countless other startups have filled the space left by legacy energy groups who have invested more in the sector’s demise than in its growth potential. As for the bank’s, their balance sheets demonstrate a stalwart commitment to fossil fuels.

What’s important to remember about PDBs is that their investment decisions are determined by a board of governors who represent the interests of their respective stakeholder nations which contribute monies to the banks. So as much as the investments reflect the banks desire to cultivate maximum return on their investments it’s also demonstration of values by the nation states, most all of which signed the Paris Climate Accord, that they are willing with one hand to support climate solutions and with the other hand support the industries fueling global warming.

Without question 2020 marks a crossroads for climate action. The moral and life giving choice may be obvious for many but morality and the fostering of life are tenets long forsaken by those whose Mecca is a stripped and shipped El Dorado. That’s why the Finance in Common Summit will be so interesting to watch. The rhetoric coming out of the event will undoubtedly be inspired but will there be action? And if there is, will the action be a repackaged version of a deeply exploitative economy? Or perhaps they will have their own road to Damascus moment and embark on a journey of subdued short-term margins for long-term market health and reliability.

World Bank invested over $10.5 billion in fossil fuels since Paris Agreement

Big Shift Global – Research Papers

Calling for an end to public financing of fossil fuels and a shift to investing in sustainable, renewable energy to provide energy access for all

  • World Bank provides assistance and finance for fossils despite climate pledge
  • Energy transition too slow to avert climate crisis
  • Ongoing fossil fuel investments push world past 1.5°C global warming

Berlin, Washington D.C. | October 12th 2020


As the World Bank conducts its digital Annual Meeting, civil society groups criticize the bank’s ongoing investments in the fossil fuel industry. Research conducted by Urgewald reveals that the World Bank Group has invested over $12 billion in fossil fuels since the Paris Agreement, $10.5 billion of which were new direct fossil fuel project finance.

In order to arrest the escalating climate crisis, the world needs an urgent and just transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. Data shows that the energy transition is happening far too slowly. Researchers from several expert organizations, including the UN Environment Program, determined the world is currently on track to produce 120% more fossil fuels by 2030 than is compatible with a 1.5°C pathway. [1] Thus, we are already on track to miss the Paris Climate Agreement goal. In addition, according to the Economist, annual investments in wind and solar capacity need to reach about $750 billion, which requires a tripling of current investment levels. [2]

Simply put, there is far too much invested in fossil fuel production and not enough in renewable energy. Actions that slow down the energy transition result in more destabilizing climate-related consequences. The World Bank states that without urgent action, climate change will push more than 100 million people into poverty by 2030. [3]

View the Full Report 


The Big Shift Global is a multi-stakeholder, global campaign coordinated by organisations from the Global North and South. Together, we aim to make the people’s views on energy finance known to Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs), their Executive Directors, as well as the Heads of State and Finance Ministers of the members countries. Learn More…

Portland General Electric to close only coal-fired power plant in Oregon

Congratulations to the state of Oregon on the announcement of closing its only coal-fired plant! Gratitude to all the community members who worked diligently towards this result. Many thanks to the Sierra Club and it’s Oregon Chapter for their dedication towards this important win. 

 

Portland General Electric announced it has closed its power plant in Boardman, the only coal-fired plant in the state.

Portland General Electric on Thursday announced it has closed its eastern Oregon coal-fired power plant 20 years ahead of schedule as the utility pushes to use more sustainable forms of energy.

The closure of the Boardman plant comes as the result of an agreement between the utility, consumers and regulators reached in 2010 to curb air pollution and carbon dioxide emissions in the state. In exchange for closing the plant, the utility was allowed to make smaller investments in pollution controls.

The Morrow County plant, which opened in 1977, is the youngest U.S. coal plant closed for environmental reasons, the utility said when the agreement was reached.

Read on at The Oregonian…

 

Learn More from their journey…

Oregon’s Lone Coal-Fired Power Plant Slated to Close, December 10, 2010