Author: Shannon M.D. Smith

Karenna Gore on Climate Ethics & Corporate Social Responsibility at LIM

Originally posted  by Janise Vargas

On Monday, February 4, our Sustainability and the Future of Fashion class at LIM College shared a conversation with Founder and Director of the Center for Earth Ethics at Union Theological Seminary, Karenna Gore. We spoke about climate change and its relation to ethics and social justice on a global scale.

Daughter of former Vice President Al Gore Jr., Ms. Gore had a political upbringing, but her professional expertise lies in ecological conservation, ministry, and social justice. Gore founded the Center for Earth Ethics in 2015, after the Religions for the Earth conference held at Union in 2014. At this conference, over 200 religious and spiritual leaders gathered to emphasize climate as a moral issue and apply faith-based activism to help fix it. Gore explained that the Center’s purpose is to generate dialogue around the immorality of climate change and train leaders to implement change across the world.

I found Gore’s focus on social justice and ministry to be intriguing because it is a niche perspective on our threatened ecosystem. When talking about climate change, most people think of the very tangible effects it has on the earth’s landscape and our weather system. However, listening to Gore refocused my lens toward the humanitarian crises—which include threats like floods, food shortages, and large-scale displacements of populations—that will result if change is not made now. Gore believes that the magnitude of hope and good-will that accompany followers of faith can be the catalyst society needs to spark progressive efforts toward conserving our planet and improving our society.

Being that we are taking this sustainability course at a business-focused fashion college, how can we change the fashion industry to better serve the environment? Gore had a number of solutions to this problem, one of which included measuring the success of a business beyond profit. She explained that examining a brand’s globalism and ecological footprint are very relevant measurements of a company’s effect on the people it serves internationally as well as how its business practices affect the environment. I believe if every fashion brand started to prioritize their ecological footprint, that alone would initiate visible change on our planet.

On a macro level, we talked about government and its role in climate change and conservatory efforts. Joining our lecture was Professor Gayathri Banavara, from LIM’s Marketing, Management & Finance department. Professor Banavara asked if government policy should play a role in conservatory efforts. She used, as an example, India, which has imposed a policy on incoming corporations to contribute 2% of their profits to maintaining India’s landscape and resources and improving their infrastructure. Gore implored the helpfulness of this practice and explained that government policy can play a major role in climate change. If political leaders used their power and influence to create conservatory policies and eco-friendly regulations, companies and people as a whole would be forced to take these issues seriously and implement change. She also explained that similar to business, governments measure a nation’s success with a bottom-line mentality, considering only GDP. The problem is, GDP does not measure aspects like pollution, depletion of resources or environmental harm. Nations are being held to a standard of profitability only, and it is that mentality that has led to our overuse of resources.

I found Gore’s presentation and dialogue inspiring, because it allowed my perception of climate change and the realities of it to come full circle. I came away feeling that it is important to know and share this information—we must emphasize the immorality of ignoring our changing environment and warn against the humanitarian crisis that will result should we continue this way. As future business leaders and advocates for change, we must use this knowledge to change how business is conducted. There is much more at stake than hotter summers.

Topics: Climate ChangesustainabilityLIM Undergraduate Studiesguest speakers,SustainableSustainable Fashionsocial responsibilityCorporate Social Responsibilty

CEE New Year Update: Ancient Future Wisdom

At the Center for Earth Ethics, we seek to be attentive and educated advocates for clean air and clean water, sustainability initiatives that move us to a just transition & the protection of indigenous wisdom and sacred sites across the globe.

In the Fall of 2018, CEE Director Karenna Gore curated a series of events at The Rubin Museum of Art in New York City as the Future Fellow of the Karma Series. This creative and intuitive space provided a laboratory for exploring themes intimately connected to the work of the Center. Indigenous wisdom keepers such as Mona Polacca, Tiokasin Ghosthorse and Winona LaDuke dialogued with contemporary artists and cultural influencers from Naomi Klein to Laurie Anderson to Jeff Sachs while engaging with diverse audience members. Topics included Rights of Nature: Do Rivers Have Rights?, Original Instructions of Mother Earth and facing despair in the time of climate change. A major highlight was the newly articulated workshop on Indigenous Timekeeping and Sacred Sites taught by CEE’s Original Caretakers Program developers Mindahi Bastida and Geraldine Patrick.

2019 already promises to be a year of convening local and global networks of faithful and inspired people who will continue to bring our social and environmental arcs towards justice.  Join us!


ORIGINAL CARETAKERS

CEE’s Mindahi Bastida traveled to the Vatican this summer for the conference “Saving Our Common Home and the Future of Life on Earth”. While there, Mindahi was able to meet Pope Francis and deliver a message about preserving biocultural heritage and ancestral sacred sites.
Read Mindahi’s Full Letter

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

“The US pulled out of the Human Rights Council, but I am here standing for Human Rights.” – Catherine Coleman Flowers, Palais Des Nations, UN Headquarters in Geneva. In 2019, the work to expose extreme poverty and the cause and effects related to climate change goes on.


CULTURE & AGRICULTURE

Woven Skin Talks was a discussion inspired by the project WOVEN SKIN by Dutch artist Claudy Jongstra. Our lives are woven into the landscape, even in these modern times.  To know the source of our materials, fabrics, dyes and the care of the animals that provide these resources is part of our moral responsibility.  How does this relate to larger conversations about FOOD SYSTEMS?  And how does art help us to get IN TOUCH with the subject matter?

DOCTRINE OF DISCOVERY

In order to make a Just Transition, we need to make changes at a deeper level in our society. One of our great challenges is to unpack the legacy of the 15th century Papal Bulls that allowed the colonization and enslavement of native peoples throughout the Americas, in Africa and beyond.  Join us in conversation about how genocide, environmental justice, and care for our common home are interconnected. Learn more: Doctrine of Discovery

PLANT WISDOM

Herbalist in Residence, Poppy Jones took to the trees with CEE’s Director Karenna Gore to Stand4Forests. Our team continues to build curriculum exploring nature as both classroom and church. Thanks to our friends at the Dogwood Alliance for capturing
Finding Faith in Forests.
Learn More: Spring 2019 Course Plant Wisdom and Ecological Consciousness at UTS


MINISTRY in the TIME of CLIMATE CHANGE 2019

 

This year’s Minister’s Training will be held at Methodist Theological Seminary in Ohio in partnership with MTSO and the Climate Reality Project. We’re focusing on the impacts climate change has on agriculture and land use, and what faith communities can do to respond. The application for the training will open in February so keep an eye out for it!


 

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The ‘Epiphany’ of the Importance of Trees

As Twelfth Night passes, some celebrate King’s Day, others Nollaig na mBan (Women’s Christmas in Irish), and others – still singing carols and drinking cider – go a Wassailing.

“Love and joy come to you and to you, your Wassail, too.  And God Bless you and send you a Happy New Year.  And God Send you a Happy New Year.”

The Wassail was a tree festivity.  A night to play, possibly to drink the cider fermented from Samhain – the Celtic New Year – and to pour libations out upon the roots of trees to ask for blessings upon the orchards.

Trees were an important part of early European culture.  They fed humans and animals alike with their nuts, fruits and seeds.  Each kind of tree was seen as having its own character and wisdom.  The first Irish language, Ogham, is often described as “the tree alphabet” because the letters were based on their unique qualities.  Invaders to Celtic lands cut and burned down the forests to decrease defensive cover for the native people.  Perhaps this history also inspires a longing to protect the trees that remain for present and future generations.

In a time when we have destroyed as much as 50% of our tropical forests globally, when we are learning that deforestation practices are significantly contributing to the increase of greenhouse gasses annually, that the absence of forests increases the devastation humans experience in the wake of drought / flood cycles – perhaps it is time to have an Epiphany as to the importance of trees.

Humans have a relationship with trees unlike any other part of nature.  A simple refresher course on how humans breathe ought to remind us of this as human beings inhale oxygen which enters the blood and is circulated throughout the body by the heart which returns the blood to the lungs so we can exhale carbon dioxide bi-product.  The trees then absorb the carbon dioxide and transform it back into oxygen with the help of the sun.  The trees are our counterparts to maintain balance in our environment and to sustain life.

On the exchange of Gasses:  “The exchange takes place in the millions of alveoli in the lungs and the capillaries that envelop them… inhaled oxygen moves from the alveoli to the blood in the capillaries, and carbon dioxide moves from the blood in the capillaries to the air in the alveoli.” 

How do Trees Help Us Breathe?

This January, take time to bless the trees – in your yard, in your neighborhood park, in your forests, in orchards, at your church or temple – anywhere and everywhere you interact with trees in your life.  It is said the trees talk to one another through their complex roots systems underground and if you tend to an old tree, a Mother Tree, or Guardian Tree that old one will communicate to all the others.  So send blessings to the trees for their flourishing and restoration.  Let us apologize for forgetting just how important they are to our survival.  Let us learn their names and attributes one more.  And let us protect them from the real world threats which would clear them unnecessarily, and lead to our demise.  In the spirit of a healthy New Year, to you and your Wassail too, let us go outside and bless the trees.

***

A Druid Blessing for the Trees

A nine-fold blessing of the sacred grove
Now be upon all forests of Earth:
For willow of the streams, 
Hazel of the rocks,
Alder of the marshes,
Birch of the waterfalls,
Ash of the shade,
Yew of resilience,
Elm of the brae,
Oak of the sun,
And all trees that grow and live and breathe

On hill and brake and glen:
No axe, no saw, no fire shall harm you,
No mind of ownership shall seize you,
No hand of greed or profit claim you,
But grace of the stepping deer among you,
Strength of the running boar beneath you,
Power of the gliding hawk above you.

Deep peace of the running stream through your roots,
Deep peace of the flowering air through your boughs,
Deep peace of the shining stars on your leaves.

That the harp of the woods be heard once more
Throughout the green and living Earth.

– Mara Freeman, Honorary Chief Bard of the Order of Bards, Ovates, and Druids – Copyright 2001, The Order of Bards, Ovates, and Druids

***

To learn more about Forests, Deforestation and how to help, here are some resources:

Vandana Shiva:  Everything I Need to Know I Learned in the Forest

UN Environment Programme: Forests

Stand4Forests Climate Plan from the Dogwood Alliance

CEE November Update

Dear Friends,

Karenna Gore and CEE’s Herbalist in Residence, Poppy Jones, were joined by the Dogwood Alliance for a walk in the woods at NY City’s Van Cortlandt Park this fall.  Please enjoy Stories Happen in Forests‘ video, “Finding Faith in the Forest” giving you a window into their time together and a deep spiritual connection to the woods. The Dogwood Alliance is dedicated to reminding us how both magical & critical to our survival our Forests really are.

Join us and these heroic #ForestDefenders in building a powerful movement to protect our sacred forests. Learn more about their amazing work!

In Gratitude,
The Center for Earth Ethics Team

 

Join CEE this Month


Indigenous Timekeeping
and Sacred Sites Workshop

with Mindahi Bastida and Geraldine Patrick
Nov 17th, 2018, 11:30 am to 2:30 pm

Developing a Time-Space Consciousness
Activating Sacred Sites
Writing a Letter to our Beloved Home Landscape

THE RUBIN MUSEUM
150 West 17th St.
New York, NY 10011

Climate Change from the Perspective of Religious Traditions

“Indigenous American Religious Traditions and a ‘Wholistic’ Ecological Vision” with Karenna Gore, Mindahi Bastida and Geraldine Patrick

Sunday, November 18th
11:15 am – 12:15 pm

ALL SOULS CHURCH, NYC
1157 Lexington Avenue
New York, NY 10075

 

Sunday Scholars Panel: The Hudson as Life Force

How has the River been changed by us,
and how have we in turn, been changed by it?

Paul Gallay, President of Hudson Riverkeeper, moderates
with Karenna Gore, John Waldman, David Schuyler & Lee Bitsoi
Nov 18th, 2018, 2:00 – 3:00 pm, RSVP Required

Co-Hosted by Hudson Riverkeeper and
the Hudson River Museum

HUDSON RIVER MUSEUM
1511 Warburton Avenue
Yonkers, NY 10701

Mindahi Bastida joins International Gathering of Indigenous Leaders and Artists

Commemorating the First Anniversary of the
Return of Mungo Man

A Choice for PEACE Awareness

Grandmother Maria Alice of The International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers is sending a message of peace and awareness for what is going on in her home country of Brazil, and asks for your prayers at this crucial time.  Her plea calls us all into a place of conscious choice.

————————–———

A CHOICE FOR PEACE AWARENESS

As a woman, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother my choice is for peace, for life and for the respect of all lives.

At this moment, I share this message to all who can hear me, and to Brazilians in particular.

We are facing a serious scenario that challenges the inner harmony of people, both personally and socially. The beliefs and convictions, and the physical, emotional and mental stability of people are in jeopardy. We are facing threats and counter-information. In the media there is no longer any control over the truth of what is being reported. What is going on is referred to as a “democratic process”, but that is not what we are seeing or experiencing. There is a violent power connected with international groups’ interests and greed, which is creating an obscure atmosphere intended to manipulate our choice. Most simple people are confused, frightened and disoriented believing in false news and in false promises.

At this point we are challenged to make a choice and this choice will define the future of our nation and our people, impacting our children and nature. It will even influence the whole world. We need to be really aware. We cannot act under pressure or impulse. We must meditate seriously within ourselves, within the inner temple of our hearts. Do we want weapons? Do we want torture? Do we want inequality? Will we condone racial persecution? Or do we want peace and freedom? Is it possible that guns, torture and brutality can serve to bring us peace? I think history has already proved to us that the answer is NO. The more weapons, the more suffering, the more hate, the more revenge, the greater the consequences for everyone. Why should we believe in the illusion that a weapon gives us power when we can believe in the power of love of a brother and sisterhood?

Whatever spiritual path we choose to follow, we learn that we are all in the likeness of the same Creator. That the light that shines in me also shines in every being of Creation. When this light is given the opportunity to shine in each one, it is then that we will know freedom.

Freedom teaches us the responsibility of our choice. If we are free and we choose evil, we will reap the fruit of this action. If we choose weapons, one day we will be hit by them. If we choose the destruction of the Amazon, we will be responsible for the drought all over the planet, not to mention the extinction of thousands of animal lives and plant species that hold great medicinal power. If we choose to withdraw the right of the indigenous peoples to their lands, we will be annihilating the guardians of life and the natural richness of our planet; furthermore, we will be diminishing our roots and our ancestry.

When our choice affects the collective, then our responsibility is even greater. We must step with calmness and maturity, for if we act impulsively we can fail. The question is, do we choose peace or violence? In this moment we are being confronted with such a choice. Such is the gravity of our situation. If we choose to be neutral we are also deceiving ourselves. Neutrality here is an illusion. The one who thinks he is being neutral is also responsible for the result of the collective choice.

This choice seems political, but it is not. A deeper and more decisive choice is at hand. Are we going to choose to be human or are we going to negate our humanness? If we are human, we need to embrace our diversity, those who are most alike and those who are different. Everyone has the same right. Therefore, if our choice affects the rights and freedom of the other, our rights and freedom will also be affected.

Time now puts us before a great opportunity to develop and grow our consciousness. We must act with awareness. Not react. Do not act on impulse or by pressure.

My awareness as a mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, teaches me to act with love and respect for all creation. We are all different, yet in all of us there is a longing for good, a longing for peace. Sometimes the disappointments that we go through in life create calluses in our feelings, and that may create reactive behaviors. We become rigid and disconnected from the original longing of our heart. But if we are calm, and if we learn to deepen the yearning for the child that dwells in each of us, surely we will find the choice for peace, happiness, freedom and respect for the beauty of nature and all of life.

I invite all of you to unite now around this great alliance for good, for brother and sisterhood, for the respect of our lives, with all its differences, and be a pillar and an instrument for love.

MAY ALL BECOME AWAKENED IN PEACE AWARENESS!!!

Grandmother Maria Alice Campos Freire, Brazil

Climate Change Is a Civil Rights Issue: Here are 4 Ways to Respond

A thoughtful response to the state of our climate and ways to meaningfully respond. The Rev. Dr. Gerald L. Durley combines the disciplines of faith and science with the lessons learned as a civil/human rights advocate from the 1960s.
COMMENTARY by Gerald L. Durley 

America is at one of its most critical points in its illustrious history. Global warming and environmental injustice have evolved into a corrosive, divisive concern where lines of mistrust are deeply drawn in the minds of those who hold differing opinions. There appears to be entrenched emotional camps of dueling understanding as to whether climate change is a natural pattern of weather evolution or has been created by the human footprint.

As a civil rights activist from the civil rights movement of the ‘60s, I continue to believe that everyone has constitutional rights. Thousands of Americans are being denied their civil and human rights because insensitive or politically manipulated legislators are creating policies that are destroying the environment. When profit, rather than the well-being of human and environmental life, determine the survival of the planet, it is a civil rights issue.

Fifty-eight years later, it has become blatantly clear that we need to implement some of the organizational strategies of the civil rights movement to advance the climate change movement. It is my hope that this response will ensure that every person has access to toxin-free air and uncontaminated water.

Science confirms that humans are the primary perpetrators of climate change. Scientists from all over the world are now increasingly certain that the drastic weather changes, which we are currently experiencing, are the result of human involvement. It is now an accepted fact that the greenhouse effect is a result of excess carbon dioxide trapping solar radiation from the atmosphere, causing the earth’s temperature to rise and rapidly challenging the existence of all living things. Acidity in the oceans is increasing at an unprecedented rate and rising water temperatures are causing bleaching to once beautiful corals.

There are numerous reports, studies, and surveys that detail the negative impact global climate change poses, specifically to communities of color, low-income neighborhoods, and rural areas.

Fossil fuel, automobile emissions, and methane gas, which is the byproduct of fracking, have created a critical tipping point that will affect all life —human, animal, and plant.

Floods, hurricanes, droughts, wild fires, extreme heat waves, earthquakes, asthma, loss of life and property are the glaring aftermath of a changing climate.

I realize that businesses are structured in such a way that they must profit in order to remain viable. The moral questions that must be asked of them are: At whose expense? And at what cost to the sustainability of the planet and its inhabitants?

The earth is experiencing some of the hottest temperatures ever recorded. We are witnessing conflicts over water, not oil. The bee population is being decimated. Pollination of essential food crops has diminished, posing a threat to global food supply.

Climate change has become a runaway train.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once said, “We must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools.” Climate change is a civil rights issue which business, political, educational, and faith leaders must join forces to stop.

I am more confident now than ever before that we must, can, and will be victorious in this moral civil rights struggle for the environment and for all life.

A few meaningful action steps and strategies that can reduce the impact of climate change:

Read on…

 

Prayer of Thanks for Creation

Leader :    Let us pray.

 

Thank you, God,

Thanks for beauty:

The twinkle in an older person’s eye,

A child’s shout of laughter;

Thanks for the greening trees and frozen waterfalls,

Stunning buildings and flowerbeds in summer.

All:    Thanks for beauty.

 

Thank you, God,

Thanks for creativity:

The skills of the tapestry weaver,

The imagination of a web designer;

Thanks for bakers and dancers and crossword compilers,

For spiders’ webs and city murals.

Thanks for creativity.

 

Thank you, God,

Thanks for abundance:

For seeds and raindrops,

For grains of sand and infinite galaxies;

Thanks for seagulls, plankton and shoals of mackerel,

For wriggling worms and golden dandelions.

Thanks for abundance.

 

Thanks for your world, God,

And for our part in it.

Thanks that you are a maker,

And that you made us makers, too.

 

Help us to love creation as you love it,

To take risks to value it as Jesus did,

And draw us into the wildness and wonder

Of your Holy Spirit

Today and every day.

Amen.

***

E-Liturgies and Prayers on Creation from the Iona Community

Celebrating the Season of Creation 

Image: Navajo (Dine) pictorial rug with Spiderwoman emerging from the center of the earth and emerging into the Middle World, as per the Navajo Creation tale, with stylized spiderwoman crosses represented throughout the textile. From Marcy Burns.

 

For the Season of Creation, Chinook Blessing Litany

We call upon the earth, our planet home, with its beautiful depths and soaring heights, its vitality and abundance of life, and together we ask that it

Teach us, and show us the Way.

We call upon the mountains, the Cascades and the Olympics, the high green valleys and meadows filled with wild flowers, the snows that never melt,the summits of intense silence, and we ask that they

Teach us, and show us the Way.

We call upon the waters that rim the earth, horizon to horizon, that flow in our rivers and streams, that fall upon our gardens and fields and we ask that they

Teach us, and show us the Way.

We call upon the land which grows our food, the nurturing soil, the fertile fields, the abundant gardens and orchards, and we ask that they

Teach us, and show us the Way.

We call upon the forests, the great trees reaching strongly to the sky with the earth in their roots and the heavens in their branches, the fir and the pine and the cedar, and we ask them to

Teach us, and show us the Way.

We call upon the creatures of the fields and forests and the seas, our brothers and sisters the wolves and deer, the eagle and dove, the great whales and dolphin, the beautiful Orca and salmon who share our Northwest home, and we ask them to

Teach us, and show us the Way.

We call upon all those who have lived on this earth, our ancestors and our friends, who dreamed the best for future generations, and upon whose lives our lives are built, and with thanksgiving, we call upon them to

Teach us, and show us the Way.

And lastly, we call upon all that we hold most sacred, the presence and power of the Great Spirit of love and truth which flows through all the Universe, to be with us to

Teach us, and show us the Way.

***

Chinook Blessing Litany ~ The Chinook is a tribal nation from Southwest Washington, whose ancestral lands sit at the mouth of the Columbia River.  They have been fighting for federal recognition since 1899.   Read more…

Many thanks to Diane L. Neu, Co-Founder & Co-Director of W.A.T.E.R (Women’s Alliance  for Theology, Ethics and Ritual) in Silver Spring, MD, for publishing this Chinook Blessing Litany in her book Return Blessings.

The Season of Creation is an annual, worldwide celebration of prayer and action organized by Christian faith leaders from around the world united in the cause to protect our common home and is open to all to participate.  The Season begins with the World Day of Prayer for Creation on September 1st and extends to the Feast Day of Saint Francis on October 4th. This year’s Season of Creation has the theme of “walking together”.  In walking together, we follow the role of Jesus, who walked with friends on the roads around Jerusalem.  As he traveled the byways of his community, Jesus invited us to encounter God through God’s presence in creation. Whether by considering “the lilies of the field” or the “grain of wheat that falls to the earth,” the spiritual journey of following Jesus is closely tied to the everyday wonders of nature that He experienced in His earthly journey.  Learn More / Participate…

***

In Case You Missed It… CEE Update from August 30th: Are You Ready to RISE for Climate Justice?

Here’s Everything You Need to Know for the Upcoming Week of Action on Climate

(P.S.  There’s still time to help flyer at events around the city including joining today’s Caribbean-West Indian Day Parade climate contingent.)


Rise For Climate, Jobs, and Justice is less than two weeks away, and  Thursday, 8/30 at 8 PM EST is a national organizing call to get everyone fired up and ready to RISE!

On the call, you’ll hear from amazing organizers like Cherri Foytlin, an organizer with The L’eau Est La Vie (Water is Life) Camp in Louisiana, Lucas Zuker with Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable EconomyRoberto Jesus Clack with Warehouse Workers For Justice, and Ananya Singh with the Sierra Student Coalition about the actions they are hosting across the country.

Come be inspired by all the incredible work that people across the United States
are doing to fight climate change on the frontlines.

RSVP here to be a part of the call TONIGHT at 8 pm EST and join the movement!

 

CEE invites you to join us along with hundreds of other Participating Groups around the world to RISE for Climate, Jobs and Justice. FIND AN EVENT NEAR YOU!

We’ve included some helpful links below on the special #RiseNY Event on September 6th, and links to Faith and Indigenous Community Events in San Francisco leading up to the GCAS and beyond.


STARTING THE WAVE

NYC – BATTERY PARK – SEPTEMBER 6TH
GET CONNECTED!


Join us on September 6th at 5:30 pm at Battery Park to kick off a wave of climate action!  In the face of policy reversals on oil and gas drilling, coal, asbestos, pipelines, car emissions, and the Clean Air Act – now more than ever we need to:
  • Enact A Just Transition to 100% Renewable Energy Now!
  • Stop All Fossil Fuel Infrastructure
  • Make Corporate Polluters Pay
  1. Help flyer at events around the city or join the Caribbean-West Indian Day Parade climate contingent.
  2. Join a Subway Blitz.
  3. Dial a fellow NY’er to get them to the march.
  4. Come to a Community Art Build, Aug 30th or Sept 1st.
  5. To participate in a Direct Action on Sept 7th, contact us at [email protected].

Interfaith and Indigenous Bloc in CA 

Faith Communities in California 
RISE for Climate, Jobs and & Justice

Indigenous Bloc at RISE Days of Action
San Francisco, CA


 

Intertribal Prayer, Teach-In & Direct Action Training

37th Indigenous Women of the Americas Defending Mother Earth Treaty New Moon Ceremony

RISE Against Climate Capitalism

 

Have Questions? Ask at the Indigenous Bloc Facebook Page.  For more Actions check out ItTakesRoots.org and the Climate Justice Alliance.


If you are in New York City, join CEE’s Karenna Gore and Rev. Leo Woodbury of Kingdom Living Temple as we convene the 2018 Global South Summit at the United Nations Church Center on September 14th. The Summit is a solutions driven program serving to bring allies together, thereby strengthening our potential impact through partnership.  Read More…

Poor People’s Campaign Gives Testimony at Congressional Hearing

A movement is happening.  The Poor People’s Campaign has launched a united force for change bringing together people of diverse backgrounds who share a common calling to restore reason and dignity to the United States of America.  This stage of the campaign – 40 Days of Moral Action – began on Mother’s Day and will culminate in a Global Day of Solidarity and Mass Rally in Washington, D.C. on June 23rd.

Last week the Poor People’s Campaign – A National Call for Moral Revival moved forward into it’s 4th Week with the proclamation – “Everybody’s Got the Right To Live” including the rights to Education, Living Wages, Jobs, Income and Housing.  Non-Violent Civil Disobedience rallies were documented from Kentucky to California, Mississippi to New York, Minneapolis and Michigan.  

In response to the wave of non-violent direct actions, resulting in arrests across the country, Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts) and Representative Elijah Cummings (D- Maryland) called a hearing on Capital Hill to listen to testimony from Rev. William Barber and a panel of citizens among the most impacted by the various forms of violence and degradation being committed against our people and our planet.

Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis was detained with eight other faith leaders overnight after being arrested on the steps of the Supreme Court.  CEE’s Karenna Gore joined Rev. Barber and those offering testimony to read Rev. Theoharis’s statement on her behalf.  Please watch the hearing and follow the link below to join the Mass March in DC on June 23rd or an event in Global Solidarity in your local area.

U.S. Congressional Hearing in Response to the Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren and U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings convene a hearing on Capitol Hill on economic inequality, union rights, voter suppression and other issues raised by the new Poor People’s Campaign. U.S. Sen. Cory Booker is expected to be among a dozen lawmakers who will hear testimony from and question campaign Co-Chairs Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II and Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis, along with victims of systemic poverty, systemic racism, ecological devastation and America’s war economy.

Posted by Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival on Tuesday, June 12, 2018

 

Please join us in supporting this moral movement in DC or in solidarity with your local community.