Author: Mindahi Bastida

‘We Hold the Earth’ Interfaith Climate Prayer Earth Day 2020 – Mindahi Bastida

“We greet All Our Relations and All Our Relations means based on the sacred elements of life.

We greet the fire, the air, the earth and the wind.  We human beings are the reflection of the sacred elements and we are circumstantial to the Mother Earth.

We pray for Mother Earth to stand up with us in these critical times of anthropocentrism.

We are facing bio-cultural crisis and we as human beings we need to remember who we are, why we are here on this planet that we call Mother Earth.

We need peace.

But also, we need also to make peace with Mother Earth.

We want to come together. We want to work together. And we need to come together in order to overcome this crisis, this civilizational crisis that is killing life.

We pray for Mother Earth and the sacred elements to help us and stand up with us.

We have come the problem but we can be the solution.

We ask all the spiritual leaders, the spiritual leaders around the world, that we have a lot of work to do in order to conserve life.

Because we came to this beautiful planet to take care, not to take over.

We call attention to all people even if they are not religious, that they come together in order to live in harmony, in balance, in peace and in dignity.

Kjamadi (Thank you)”

Parliament of the World’s Religions – Earth Day 2020 Interfaith Climate Prayer

       Center for Earth Ethics - Faded Logo

Mindahi Bastida’s Message on Toltec Wisdom

Toltec timekeepers knew about the 26 thousand year cycle of the precession of the equinoxes. That is the time it takes for our planet to be aligned to the same north star back again. It consists of five cycles of fifty-two hundred years. We have just completed the fifth of these cycles, which for the Toltec was known as the fifth Sun. It was composed of ten cycles of five hundred and twenty years each. The last cycle started in 1492 and ended in the year 2012.

They knew that it would be a time of destruction and degradation. They knew that the last fifty-two years would be the worst, for by then every single aspect of Creation would be completely eroded. They knew that starting on 2012, year 1 Flint, Mother Earth would start a thirteen-year cycle of cleansing until year 1 House, which is 2025. This cycle was announced as 4 Movement, because it refers to the Four Elements moving powerfully together, which means, Earthquakes, Fires, Hurricanes and Floods.

As you can see, I have not mentioned people as agents of that destruction and degradation. But we know that we are participating in the cycles of life with Mother Earth. So, the destruction that started in this continent of the Americas in 1492 led to the degradation of bio-cultural traditions, exerted by civilizations that had chosen to stop respecting and relating to the cycles of life. Those civilizations thought that their purpose in life is to achieve salvation, and that it did not matter to kill, destroy, or extract, if by doing that they could get a place in heaven.But now that they have polluted their own water, their own air, their own soil and their own fire, now that they have polluted their own bodies, their own organs, their own cells and their own genes, they are crumbling as a civilization. Mother Earth will continue to go through her cleansing process.

Those of us who have kept to the Toltec ways, have been preparing for a long time. We have kept our medicinal systems, we have kept our food systems, our sacred sites and our sacred calendars.

We accompany Mother Earth in her cleansing process with much respect, acknowledging that this is her time, and we are paying close attention to all that is unfolding during these thirteen years. We are sharing what she is communicating with everyone, and whoever is ready to listen and take in with wisdom and humility, will know what to do, how to behave, what to change in their way of life.

All of us have a chance to rise to a new level of consciousness, with an attitude and a renewed commitment of living with Mother Earth.

***

Originally Published by The Fountain for Sacred Lands / Sacred Cultures / Sacred Economics. 

Miradas Contemporáneas de los Pueblos Originarios en México: Contemporary views of native peoples in Mexico

Contemporary Views of Indigenous Peoples in Mexico summarizes a broad discussion on the role of native groups in Mexico and the condition of ethnic groups throughout the national territory. For hundreds of years, indigenous and Afro-descendant peoples have been excluded from the central development of Mexico, and to a greater or lesser extent, these groups have occupied a residual place in the public policies of the different governments, and have regularly suffered discrimination for part of the rest of the population.

CEE’s Mindai Bastida contributes, authoring the first chapter in the publication, “Los Pueblos Originarios en el Contexto de la Globalización” (The Original People in the Context of Globalization).

PDF Access Page through the Autonomous University of the State of Mexico Portal

Miradas contemporáneas de los pueblos originarios en México

Estrada Rodríguez, José LuisHerrera Tapia, FranciscoBastida Muñoz, Mindahi CrescencioMarcos Martínez, FranciscoArredondo-Ayala, Georgina MaríaFranco Maass, SergioCruz Balderas, YolandaNateras González, Martha ElisaCisneros, José LuisAnguiano Luna, HilarioPillado Albarrán, Karla VioletaRamírez Hernández, Javier JesúsTorres Oregón, FredydAvitia Rodríguez, Jessica AlejandraMontero Gutenberg, GervasioLinas Montiel, GuadalupeMoctezuma Pérez, SergioQuintero Salazar, BacilizaGarduño Mendoza, MarthaSam Bautista, María MagdalenaHernández Rivera, AriadnaMendieta Ramírez, AraceliAlejandro García, Saúl
Fecha: 2019-08-10

Resumen:

Este libro resume una amplia discusión sobre el papel que tienen los grupos originarios en México y la condición de las etnias a lo largo del territorio nacional. Desde hace cientos de años los pueblos indígenas y afrodescendientes han sido excluidos del desarrollo central de México, y en mayor o menor medida, estos grupos han ocupado un lugar residual en las políticas públicas de los diferentes gobiernos, y sufrido de manera regular la discriminación por parte del resto de la población.

Mostrar el registro completo del objeto digital

Holy Land – Living Water

Middle East (Jordan, Palestine and Israel)

The Holy Land Living Water event, organized by Unity Earth in collaboration with EcoPeace Middle East and in partnership with the United Religions Initiative, has been a historic journey of spirit, music and ecology. The event took place on February 1-7, 2020, and we visited sacred places and shared rituals and ceremonies in Jordan, Israel and Palestine.

This journey and pilgrimage forms part of Unity Earth’s Road to 2020, “a series of worldwide events designed to capture new opportunities for weaving a spirit of unity and peaceful coexistence across the Earth”. The Jordan River Valley, which is of high importance for the Abrahamic Religions, was the main focus of the journey along with visits to related sacred places. In the Middle East, water is critical for survival of many species and people and it has been under dispute for decades.

The Jordan River is a sacred river. Over the past fifty years almost all of the waters have been diverted and the remaining waters have been polluted and commodified, especially in the Lower Jordan. This means the Jordan River Valley has been under desecration and is now facing ecological crisis. This injustice is threatening the people and the environment, and it is a situation that is being addressed in a joint effort to recover peace and dignity in the Holy Land. One of the purposes of this journey has been to bring attention to the importance of cooperation around water management and about the human relationship with water for a higher standard of living in the territory. This could enhance sustainable livelihoods and generate regional political stability.

This event brought ecologists and spiritual leaders from different faith traditions to share about the importance to uphold a common conviction, not just among monotheist Abrahamic faiths. We also spoke about the importance to practice responsible stewardship for the land and specifically for water, because the sacred element of water is at the core of raising awareness about our relationship with nature and ultimately with Mother Earth. There is an urgent need to achieve peace among peoples, but most important is to be at peace with Mother Earth – our common home.

It has also been the intention of this international event to bring public awareness to the work of EcoPeace about the socio-ecological rehabilitation and sustainability of the lower Jordan Valley, shared by Jordan, Palestine and Israel. The event has used a “faith-based approach showcased in EcoPeace’s Regional NGO Master Plan for the Sustainable Development of the Jordan River Valley, as the symbolism of the Jordan River can encourage Jewish, Christian, and Muslim faithful to actively support conservation efforts of this shared natural resource”. This was affirmed during our trip and addressed at the Dead Sea Convergence: Interfaith Ecology Conference held on February 2nd.

In the trip there were more than ninety international delegates and around forty delegates from the region. Among the delegates were representatives of Indigenous Peoples from Mexico (Otomi-Toltec), United States (Dine-Navajo, Lakota), Canada (Anishinaabe), Australia (Aboriginals) and Thailand (Karen).
There were also representatives of different faith traditions, spiritual leaders of Islam, Christians, Jewish, Buddhists among others. The presence of the Green Sheik of the Arab Emirates, the Prince of Ethiopia, an Ambassador to the African Union, reggae and traditional and mystic singers, academics and scientists gave relevance to the pilgrimage.

As a representative of the Original Caretakers Program at the Center for Earth Ethics and as a spiritual representative of the Otomi-Toltec Peoples, I joined this international delegation for a historic sacred pilgrimage across the Sacred Sites of Jordan, Israel and Palestine. The Holy Land Living Water journey was dedicated principally to share worldviews, ceremonies and prayers mainly to the Jordan River Holy waters.

This event also took place in the framework of celebrating the United Nations World Interfaith Harmony Week. My participation at this event was to share and conduct the Four Directions Ceremony – Water Ceremony by the Dead Sea with all delegates, especially with the leadership of Indigenous spiritual leaders, to honor the Holy Land, the Dead Sea and the Jordan River.

We visited the most sacred places where we honored the sacred sites. During our journey we went to Al Maghtas Baptism Site, Abu-Obeida Mosque, Mount of Temptation, Church of Nativity Bethlehem, the old city of Jerusalem, Sea of Galilee, and carried out a special ceremony for Peace and Healing at Megiddo (Armageddon), led by Indigenous Spiritual Elders. At the end of the journey there was the U-NITE Harmony Week Concert and the visit to the Bahá’i Gardens in Haifa in order to close the trip and celebrate Unity.

Final Thoughts
I have been participating with Unity Earth in previous similar events in Australia, Ethiopia, the US and Canada. In all the events I have been representing my ancestral Indigenous spirituality. My work has been to share ancestral wisdom of Indigenous Peoples and to share values through indigenous ceremonies and also through speeches. This has also helped to support the work that we do at Center for Earth Ethics, called Healing and Balancing Mother Earth and Protecting Sacred Sites, which we carry out worldwide thanks to the support of Forum 21, The Fountain, and other private contributions.

In our view, the Jordan River is a biocultural sacred river that is meaningful to the region and the world, and healing and balance is needed. We want to continue to raise awareness about this situation and join efforts with the Regional NGO EcoPeace and other local initiatives.

A message from the Dead Sea
I arrived at Amman, Jordan, together with my friends, reggae singers Pato Banton and Antoinette Rootsdawtah. It was late when we got to the hotel by the shores of the Dead Sea, it was already around 2 am of February 2nd , and I went to sleep soon after, but it was just for less than an hour because a strong energy woke me up. When it was at 3 am when I began to hear a deep wailing. I didn’t get scared, but it was a hurtful cry. The crying lasted for at least ten minutes. I began to pray and concentrate so I could know where this crying was coming from. After some minutes I realized that everything was in complete silence, so I could distinguish the direction of the howling. It took me some time to understand that it was a feminine wailing and that it was coming from the heart of the Dead Sea. Then, I understood that it was the crying of Mother Earth, it was the crying of the Holy Waters that are suffering and are asking for help.

EcoPeace’s River Out of Eden Inter-faith Tool Kit

Read and Sign the Covenant for the Jordan River

Holy Land Video & Photos

Living Water Festival in Megiddo Brings Spiritual Leaders Together

We want to take you now to NorthernIsrael to the historic site of Megiddo where a peaceproject called LIVING WATERS brought togetherspiritual and political leaders. Among them, the grandsonof Ethiopia’s Emperor. Our correspondent Emily Francestells us more.

Posted by Holy Land Uncovered – i24NEWS on Sunday, February 23, 2020

 

Water Ceremony at the Dead Sea – CEE’s Mindahi Bastida (right)

 

Women in prayer over the water led by Diné elder Pat McCabe

 

Delegates visiting Abu-Obeida Mosque

Indigenous Peoples’ Voices at the World Urban Forum 9. UN-Habitat

Original Caretakers Program – Center for Earth Ethics participation at the Ninth Session of the World Urban Forum. Kuala Lumpur, 7-13  February 2018

Mindahi Bastida-Munoz participated in the Stakeholders’ Roundtable – Indigenous Peoples Session, which focused on the problems that indigenous peoples face as migrants and as citizens in the cities. Discrimination and lack of political representation are the main problematics that Indigenous Peoples are facing. Issues about land tenure, particularly for women, were also addressed. As most of the roundtable was composed of women (see picture below), their concerns for women’s rights were amply exposed. Indigenous youth were also present and they talked about the importance of including indigenous peoples’ representatives in decision making processes. Mindahi’s presentation is in Spanish. Watch it here:

My speech in the Indigenous Peoples Roundtable. Feb 11, 2018.

Posted by Mindahi Bastida on Monday, February 12, 2018

Mindahi Bastida-Munoz spoke at the Indigenous Peoples Round Table at the WUF9.

The following are the recommendations given by Mindahi Bastida-Munoz for an effective implementation of the New Urban Agenda resulting from the discussions, to inform the WUF9 Declaration:

To include youth, children, elders and women in the capacity building and the decision taking processes.

To impulse new curriculum around ancestral wisdom and spiritual values of Indigenous Peoples

To acknowledge Indigenous Peoples wisdom around the relationship humans-nature. Cities cannot live without nature and rural areas.

To work and pull together with local, national and international stakeholders and governments in the implementation of the New Urban Agenda.

Indigenous peoples need sustainable development financial support specially for the implementation of the New Urban Agenda among indigenous peoples territories and those who live or interact with the cities.

Indigenous Delegation at the World Urban Forum 9, Kuala Lumpur, February 7-13, 2018.

There was also a Special Session of Civil Engagement and Participation of the Ninth Session of the World Urban Forum, where Mindahi Bastida-Munoz delivered a message about the importance of indigenous peoples’ participation in the public agenda of UN-Habitat. He asked the leaders of the world, in reference to the New Urban Agenda, to acknowledge indigenous peoples’ participation in the decision-making processes. Additionally, he noted that a new relationship between the urban and rural is needed. Modern cities cannot live without the rural areas, from where water, oxygen, food, materials come from. Also, rural areas are sinks for carbon dioxide and liquid and solid wastes.

Civic engagement and participation from all actors is key: governments cannot achieve the New Urban Agenda on their own. We need all, and we need that no one is left behind in this inclusive process when talking about cities.

Mindahi Bastida-Munoz speaking at the Civic Engagement Special Session, WUF9.

As was stressed in the Special Session, “Civil engagement has been emphasized in the New Urban Agenda as part of the vision for cities and human settlements as the participation of urban dwellers fosters social cohesion, inclusion and safety in peaceful and pluralistic societies.”

During the forum, we distributed the Indigenous Peoples and the City Declaration in the Civic Engagement Session, the Indigenous Peoples’ Round Table and the Children and Youth Round Sessions.

The Indigenous Peoples and the City Declaration was produced last year by indigenous representatives from different peoples, including Mapuche, Kichua and Otomi, most of whom were young. We were invited to explore means to emphasize the importance of the recognition of indigenous peoples and communities in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of the New Urban Agenda, adopted in Quito, Ecuador, in October 2016 during the UN Forum Habitat III.

Mindahi Bastida-Munoz had previously participated in two side events on Indigenous Cities organized by UN-Habitat Youth during the regional meeting for Latin America and the Caribbean on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development Habitat III held in the city of Toluca, Mexico, on April 19, 2016 and during the 15th Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues held in New York City on May 13, 2016. He was the coordinator of this declaration. For more information, click here: Indigenous Peoples and the City.

Sacred Sites – Setting Sun

Protecting Sacred Sites

The Spirit is love

Protection of Sacred Sites in the World

Indigenous Peoples around the World are the caretakers of Mother Earth. It is the time of the New Dawn, it is time for the acknowledgement of their Biocultural wisdom to protect life and we need to pay respect to their spiritual and material sustainable practices.

Biocultural diversity and biocultural heritage are related concepts that intertwine culture and biodiversity. In Indigenous Peoples’ thoughts and philosophies, culture and biodiversity are interrelated and seen as unity. Precisely, thinking and feeling about the web of life as an interconnection allows us to think and act in a biocultural way of being.

Given the continuous deterioration of life systems of our Mother Earth, it is urgent to restore the most affected places in the world. The Ancestral Sacred Sites play a key role in the restoration of those affected places because Ancestral Sacred Sites are energetic points that elevate the capacity of Mother Earth to restore systemic balance.

Worldwide, Ancestral Sacred Sites are interconnected. This means that they work together energetically and potentiate the capacity of a single Place to restore the balance of a nearby affected area or region.

It is through reciprocity and specifically through ancestral rituals, by offerings and payments, how we as Ancestral Spiritual Leaders can accelerate and assure the healing process.

The proposal of biocultural sacred sites for humanity (Spiritual Reserves of Humanity) before UNESCO is crucial when we understand the connection between conservation and spiritual and cultural practices of indigenous peoples. We are presenting this initiative in order to strengthen and protect our territories and sacred sites and to mitigate the effects of Climate Change worldwide with emphasis in indigenous Peoples’ Territories.

Mindahi Bastida (Otomí-Toltec, Mexico)