Month: May 2018

Catherine Coleman Flowers

A County Where the Sewer Is Your Lawn: Catherine Coleman Flowers Op-Ed in the NY Times

A lack of proper sewage systems in rural Alabama is exposing people already living in extreme poverty to health hazards like hookworm, and denying them dignified living conditions.  Credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Originally published May 22, 2018.

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — In Alabama’s Black Belt, along the road from Selma to Montgomery where civil rights activists fought for voting rights, there’s a glaring problem that’s all too often overlooked — a lack of working sewer systems.

The Alabama Department of Public Health estimates 40 to 90 percent of homes have either inadequate or no septic system. And half of the septic systems that have been installed aren’t working properly.

Many homes here rely on straight PVC pipes that carry waste from houses to open pits and trenches that often overflow during heavy rains, bringing sewage into people’s yards where children play.

The situation isn’t much better in towns connected to relatively functioning sewer systems. Heavy rains and floodings, which seem to be intensifying because of climate change, overwhelm weak sewer systems, forcing sewage to back up in people’s homes, and contaminating drinking water.

The problem has real effects on people’s health. A 2017 report in The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene found that among 55 adults surveyed, 34.5 percent tested positive for hookworms, which thrive in areas of extreme poverty with poor sanitation. Hookworms are not deadly, but they can impede physical and cognitive development in children, and expose victims to intestinal illnesses.

I have worked on these issues for years and seen firsthand how devastating they are for residents.

Pamela Rush, a disabled mother of two children, aged 9 and 15, desperately wants to leave her mobile home in an unincorporated part of Lowndes County because she believes her family’s health is in jeopardy.

I recently visited her home, which reeked of mold and mildew. A PVC pipe carried sewage away from the house, but wasn’t nearly long enough to stop sewage from ending up in her yard. Sewage was visible just inches from the home.

Ms. Rush constantly worries that the pipe will clog and sewage will back up into her home. But she worries even more about her 9-year-old daughter, who sleeps with her, and must use a ventilation device, commonly used for sleep apnea, so she’ll get enough oxygen.

Ms. Rush doesn’t know what impact her living conditions are having on her daughter. But on a monthly income of $958, there’s no way she can afford to leave, or fix the waste disposal problems. She feels trapped.

Read the Full Article Here


Catherine is the Director of Environmental Justice & Civic Engagement and is a significant voice in the landscape of Environmental Justice in the United States.  Don’t miss her during On Water & Faith: Ministry in a Time of Climate Change, at Union Theological Seminary in New York City.  Thursday, May 31st, she will be in dialogue with Former Vice President Al Gore for our Public Evening Program, Climate, Water and Justice: Our Changing Planet & a Moral Call to Action.  Catherine will also join an  panel on Water and Justice: The Disproportionate Impacts of Climate Change and offer a Skills Training /Workshop focused on Engaging Local Communities.  

Religion and Climate Change: A Conversation with Karenna Gore

In conversation with Berkley Center Director Shaun Casey, Karenna discussed how religious communities strive to promote environmental consciousness with an aim to fulfill a responsibility for the common good.

Over the past three decades, climate change has become an increasingly prominent topic on the global agenda as advocates have marshaled scientific, policy, and moral support to protect the environment. In addition to state actors and the private sector—who engage in traditional coordinated advocacy efforts for environmental protection policies—faith-inspired actors can foster significant change in addressing environmental challenges as key participants in sacred spaces, community development, and advocacy practices. This faith-based engagement incorporates a spectrum of responses, ranging from official proclamations such as Pope Francis’ Laudato Si to indigenous efforts tied to spiritually significant locations, such as the water protectors at Standing Rock.

Originally published to www.berkleycenter.georgetown.edu.

Looking for more?  See more of Karenna Gore & the CEE Team by browsing our YouTube playlists.

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In Memorial: Rev. Dr. James H. Cone

The Center for Earth Ethics honors the life of James Cone, beloved teacher and writer. Below we share some of his work, the impact of his pioneering spirit, and thoughts from those he touched.

James Cone, the cross, and the lynching memorial
Religion News Service published this compelling piece on April 30th by Jemar Tisby, founder of Witness: A Black Christian Collective.

On April 26 America received its first-ever memorial dedicated to the more than 4,000 victims of lynching in this country. Two days later, James Cone, the acclaimed author of “The Cross and the Lynching Tree,” died.
The opening of the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Ala., and the passing of a theological legend coincide in ways that provoke thoughts about the spiritual implications of American racism. How do the cross and the lynching tree represent both injustice and redemption? How do we confront the dark truths of our past to create a future that is brighter for all people?
 Read the Full Article Here…

Video and transcripts of James Cone’s November 2007 Interview with Bill Moyers including the link to Dr. Cone’s lecture, “Strange Fruit: The Cross and the Lynching Tree,” at Harvard Divinity School.

Tribute to James Cone  Union Theological Seminary invited guests to post memories, thoughts, and meaningful experiences they’ve shared with him.  Responses came from throughout the Union community and from around the world.

Photo by Michelle Reiter, 2014, used with permission

We join in concert celebrating and honoring his remarkable life.  With thanks.

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The Center for Earth Ethics Team

Mindahi Bastida Muñoz: The Meaning of Life and Earth’s Sacred Elements

Excellence Reporter is conducting 1000+ interviews on the topic: What is the Meaning of Life?

In a time of so much turbulence and seemingly insurmountable challenges, this project is dedicated to inspiring awakening and insight.

Contributors to the site include author Rev. John Dear, activist Bill McKibben, yoga innovator Ana Forrest, Fr. Thomas Keating, Nyikina Traditional Custodian of Western Australia, Dr. Anne Poelina, and Arun Ghandi.

CEE’s Original Caretakers Program Director, Mindahi Bastida, also participated.

Read Mindahi Bastida’s full contribution here…

Excellence Reporter is also collaborating on the Charter for Compassion and with Compassionate Cities working towards meeting UN Sustainable Development Goals.

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