Month: January 2018

Closing Indian Point: Safe Decommissioning and Re-Powering NY with Sustainable Energy

On January 10th, CEE’s Director, Karenna Gore, participated in a panel discussion regarding one of NY’s most important issues: the closing of Indian Point.   Long considered a public health risk due to leaking radioactive water, the aging power plant has experienced recurring emergency shutdowns and is shown to be vulnerable to both human and natural disasters, such as an earthquake.  An accident at Indian Point could bring destruction and contamination as far south as New York City.  Now that the state has reached an agreement to close the plant, the conversation must turn to how, and what happens in it’s stead.  The easy answer may seem like natural gas, but, the science of keeping global warming under 1.5 degrees doesn’t support that claim.  “I want to emphasize that fracked gas is not the answer,” Karenna reminded.  “It is not a bridge fuel.”

Facebook Live video from our “Closing Indian Point” forum:

Closing Indian Point: Safe Decommissioning and Re-Powering New York with Sustainable Energy.

Facebook Live video from our "Closing Indian Point" forum. Our panel: Karenna Gore, Director of the Center for Earth Ethics; Cecil Corbin-Mark: Deputy Director, WE ACT; and Karl R. Rábago of the Pace Energy and Climate Center. The moderator was Paul Gallay, President and Hudson Riverkeeper.

Posted by Riverkeeper on Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Meet our panel:  Karenna Gore, Director of the Center for Earth Ethics; Cecil Corbin-Mark: Deputy Director, WE ACT; and Karl R. Rábago of the Pace Energy and Climate Center.  The moderator was Paul Gallay, President and Hudson Riverkeeper.

Paul Gallay, President and Riverkeeper explains, “Once Indian Point is closed, we won’t need to rely on fossil fuels to make up for its energy. Peak demand in the region will have declined by more than the 2,000 megawatts the plant generates, and the replacement power will be carbon neutral as the State further increases its clean energy investments,” said Gallay. “There will be little impact on electricity bills — between $1 and $2 dollars a month — which is a small price to pay for minimizing the risk that this plant poses. Going forward, new efficiency and renewable energy projects will drive still greater savings for consumers, thanks to aggressive energy investments by the state. It’s a new day for New York and the Metro region.”

Cecil Corbin-Mark talked about the great work WeAct is doing on energy efficiency in NYC and how that is part of the picture of meeting our energy needs.

Karenna spoke during the panel on faith, ethics and climate, “This conversation is about more than economics and science. It’s about morals and ethics and our responsibilities to humans across the world and here, as well as non-human life, and future generations.”   

For more information on the Closure Agreement and Riverkeeper’s promise to ‘compel full compliance’ click here: Riverkeeper.org.

Musical Seeds 2017!

Greetings, Peace and Blessings !

Hello everyone, the event at Union, Musical Seed’s was big fun!

I gave a presentation on Acorns as an important “seed ” source and one of the most abundant food sources there is!

Acorns have all the trace minerals  such as calcium, magnesium and zinc, as well as proteins. The nut to shell ratio is about 90%, which speaks of the amount of food available.

White Oak Tree Acorn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oak tree is a source of abundant wood and medicine and also it is the main food source for deer, bear, turkey, squirrel among others. It also keeps the whole ecosystem functioning.

Cross section of Acorn.

 

Red Oak and White Oak are two of the most abundant oaks trees in the northeast of Turtle Island.

School teachers should know about this abundant food source and talking about this in the class would teach children and their families to respect the forest as part of their home, not a separate entity but as part of the whole.

Millennium Tries to Silence Local Dad Over CPV Fracked Gas

For over a year, through the cold and heat, the citizens of Orange County have held weekly pickets outside the construction site of a massive fracked gas power plant being built in their community.

The CPV fracked gas power plant will emit 700 tons of known carcinogens, neurotoxins and endocrine disruptors each year and will increase demand for fracking in neighboring Pennsylvania.

Scott Martens, a father of two young children from Middletown, saw folks protesting outside the construction site, stopped by and has been involved in the fight to stop CPV ever since. He says he’s been out there almost every Saturday for a year letting people know about the threats CPV poses to his community and the planet.

Now Millennium, the company building the Valley Lateral Pipeline (VLP), a 7.8 mile pipeline that will transport fracked gas to the CPV plant from the larger Millennium transmission line, is trying to silence Scott.

They filed a SLAPP suit (A Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation that is intended to censor, intimidate, and silence critics by burdening them with the cost of a legal defense until they abandon their criticism or opposition.) against him claiming he caused irreparable harm when he filmed crews begin to clear trees for the VLP in early December. Scott was there because the tree clearing threatened the habitat of endangered bald eagles.

In a Facebook post before heading to his first court date Scott said:

“On December 1st of this year I viewed and video recorded a majestic Bald Eagle sitting in its nest in a pine tree 80 feet from the proposed Valley Lateral pipeline alignment. This is the pipeline that will bring fracked gas to the unfinished CPV power plant for the next 40 years. Since that morning I have felt a profound sense of responsibility to protect these Eagles and their habitat. At that moment I knew that the these Eagles are there to protect us and we will be there to protect them….

Read the Complete Article by Lee Ziesche on Medium